Friday Digital, Media & Technology – Privacy Reform Meets AdTech & Web3

Here are a few things that you may have missed in digital, media & technology this week.

The Privacy reform responses to the Discussion Paper has closed and all the responses are available to read.

This week are a few articles that review industry positions on the broad proposals in the Discussion Paper. There are varied opinions but mostly divided along reform vs it’s already fit for purpose lines.

Neither AdTech platforms nor privacy regulation are going anywhere, so let’s see how this turns out. It’s a global issue and perhaps privacy regulation and reform could disrupt (or curtail at least) business models built on data extraction and exploitation.

In doing so, we may need to lift the debate out of the Discussion Paper issues, and away from enhancing consent the scope of definitions. To borrow from Dr Genevieve Bell’s Garran Oration in 2021, we may need to look at what we all want as a society, not simply as consumer/business trade off, in all of this:

“We should not adhere to the notion that technology is neutral and should instead encourage debate about the values in technology and the systems that would encompass them…. We will need to actively create spaces for such conversations and equip ourselves to have them.”

These were prepared listening to Classic FM (UK) as it’s late. This newsletter is best enjoyed with a coffee… or whatever your choice.

Let me know if you want to talk about any of it, but please share with a few people and ask them to subscribe.

Brett
Media publishers more aggressively fighting privacy law overhaul than big tech, call for media exemptions
In quite a twist to the Attorney-General’s overhaul of privacy laws, in which the deadline to submissions have closed, documents filed by Australia’s biggest media groups, or their peak industry bodies, reveal major resistance on key proposals designed to give consumers more control and transparency over their data. It seems the government’s proposals threaten the business models.www.mi-3.com.au
Australia’s biggest advertisers at odds with Google, Facebook on future of data, consent
A twist in the responses! Australia’s peak advertiser body, which represents the biggest brands and billions of dollars of media investment, has sided with the ACCC over key privacy and consent changes being thrashed out by Australian lawmakers – and against the calls made by big tech platforms and even some of Australia’s big local publishers. The Australian Association of National Advertisers (AANA) says a standardised pop up would help smaller businesses that don’t have the money to spend on teams of compliance experts.www.mi-3.com.au
Go-to-Market in Web3: New Mindsets, Tactics, Metrics | Future
I have been working with some music projects built on Web 3 models. It’s a lot to take in and these frameworks for thinking about Web3 go-to-market strategy, community building, organisational structure, and token economics are helpful to get deeper into it. Because Web3 today is like the internet in 1996, waiting to see what can happen.future.a16z.com

Published by Brett

Brett is an experienced lawyer and business executive who focuses on commercial outcomes. He has worked across three sectors in England & Australia advising and leading initiatives in digital, media and technology

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